The PointBy Daniel Greenfield

Homeless Crime in LA Up 50%

You get more of what you subsidize. 

When you subsidize homelessness as Los Angeles, New York and a number of other cities driving a boom in homelessness have been doing, you get more of it. And you also get more of the crime that comes with it.

The number of crimes in which homeless individuals were listed as suspects increased by nearly 50 percent in the city of Los Angeles in 2018.

Crime data provided by the Los Angeles Police Department showed there were 8,906 crime reports between Jan. 1 and Dec. 1 this year in which a homeless person was listed as the suspect, compared with 5,976 for the same time period in 2017.’

LAPD officials said most concerning were the disproportionate number of homeless individuals listed as suspects in physical attacks that cause serious injuries, described as, “aggravated assaults,” in police records.

People described as homeless were listed as suspects in 4.3 percent of all crime reported in Los Angeles during the same period in 2018, they were listed as suspects in 12.6 percent of aggravated assaults, the crime records showed.

Well-known tailor Albert Davtyan was hit by the truck and has been in the hospital recovering from critical injuries, including a collapsed lung and several shattered ribs, family and friends told NBC4. The pushing attack was recorded by a nearby business’ security video system. Court records show Garrett Boldt, 29, was on probation for an assault with a deadly weapon case when he was arrested last Wednesday afternoon for the pushing attack. 

Aggravated assaults are quite nasty and at the top of the list of crimes you don’t want to see. And the numbers are striking.

By ’18, the number of homeless was up to 58,000 from 32,000 in 6 years. Increasing subsidies to the homeless only increased their number. As usual, government social welfare was generating more of the problem.

8.906 crime reports for homeless suspects among a population of 58,000. That’s 15% of the homeless population involved in crime. (Though some of it will be repeats.) 

This is the population group that is the most heavily subsidized and the most violent.